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Why Choose Graduate Monkey?

aptitude test tutorial, aptutorial

There are many job applicants to any position that has been declared vacant by any organization. Aptitude tests help the employer to reduce the number of successful candidates to a manageable size.  Despite many job applicants having graduated with a very high score in the university end up being taken out by this test dragon way before they get a chance to interview the job.  This implies that getting a good career job is more challenging than a college degree. It is more than just a good resume. Graduate Monkey can help you conquer this test dragon and get your dream job a step closer to you. Graduate Monkey focuses on answering the question of how you can get the top mark other than simply guiding you on what score you need to pass the test. This is achieved through their 3-in-1 test preparation packs that are designed with that goal in mind. Graduate monkey offers aptutorial packages which will guide you through the various categories and types of problems you should expect in an aptitude test. The practice test offered at Graduate Monkey will help you test your newly acquired knowledge.

Aptitude tests are not anything close to what you have handled before.  You might be skilled in solving complex mathematical problems but that does not necessarily mean you are good at numerical aptitude test for example. You might be very good at speech but this does not guarantee an automatic pass in verbal aptitude test. All too often candidates make an assumption that if they are good in math or calculations or are fluent in English then they will blitz the aptitude test. This is the wrong assumption. Each psychometric test is administered under a strict timeframe. Numerical aptitude tests for example are used by employers to measure candidate’s ability to perform task involving analysis and/or interpretation of numbers. These tests range from simple arithmetic involving addition subtraction, division and multiplication to complex and more intricate questions where you are required to interpret numerical information presented as graphs, diagrams or even tables. To master these tests, it is important to add a new set of test taking skills to your tool box.

All of the Times Top  100 Employers use aptitude tests to assess candidates innate or learned level of competence to do a given task at a particular level.  For instance, numerical tests assess one’s analytical abilities given a set of numerical data or figures to solve a problem. Nowadays recruiters in these companies are nearly obsessed with aptitude tests while the test providers are continually developing new varieties of these tests to compete with others.

Aptitude tests have both the methods and the categories through which they can be presented. For example numerical test methods may include: numerical reasoning test, collective timing for a number of questions, individual timing for each question or graphical interpretation. Categories of the aptitude test on the other hand assess aptitude or different forms of intellectual ability. Such examples Include: numerical reasoning test, verbal reasoning test and diagrammatic or spatial reasoning test.

If you are preparing for an aptitude test and are worried you can’t do it, you are not alone. As a matter of fact many graduates actually think this way before trying a different approach to prepare for aptitude tests.  You should bear in mind that as long as you have a true desire, proper guidance and the right tools, then you can improve your test score dramatically. As a matter of fact if monkeys can achieve it, why not you?

Graduate Monkey acknowledges that passing an aptitude test can be a daunting affair not because the tests are tricky but simply because there is an uneven ground used during aptitude tests preparation.  This is partly due to the many different categories of aptitude used including logical aptitude test, numerical reasoning tests and verbal reasoning tests as well as the test formats. Similarly there are many test formats such as Cubiks, TalentQ, SHL, Saville and Kenexa-PSL among others.

It is a very obvious fact that if you don’t know the kind of aptitude test questions and the data context you should expect, then you will automatically get a low test score.  That’s a fact. There is a pool of applicants for every decent graduate position. Anyone who succeeds in getting the job does so by preparing adequately in a focused manner while using the right tools in order to pass through each stage in the process.

While appreciating all of the above, Graduate monkey has developed comprehensive test tutorial packs that are focused on specific test formats and categories.  Graduate Monkey  provides preparation packs that are developed by a team of seasoned psychometric experts and that include the Kenexa and SHL style Numerical reasoning tests, Verbal reasoning test prep pack and Logical (Inductive or Abstract) reasoning test tutorials. It is evident that you will find Graduate monkey very unique in their approach. Graduate monkey does not only offer practice tests but also provide candidates with online EBooks and tutorial videos to give every candidate an opportunity to look at problems from different angles.

Aptitude Test Practice Makes Perfect

Nowadays, scoring well in aptitude tests is gaining a lot of importance more than ever before for graduates and job applicants seeking to work for major graduate employers such as banks and accounting firms. This is because aptitude testing has become an integral part in the job recruitment process. As soon as you have clicked “send” on the online job application form, odds are that you will be promptly invited to take some online verbal and numerical reasoning tests. For those applying for more specialized roles, say IT or financial modeling perhaps, you will probably be required to take diagrammatic reasoning tests as well. Candidates must show ability to complete the numerical reasoning aptitude test, verbal reasoning aptitude test and diagrammatic reasoning aptitude tests quickly and carefully in order to qualify for the next stage of the job in question. In most cases, aptitude testing is the first stage in the screening process. If you succeed in this stage you will progress further to other interview rounds. However, don’t be surprised when you are subjected to further tests. It is therefore important to practice these tests way before the actual test.

Aptitude tests can strike fear at times even to the most confident student. It is important to note that almost everybody is likely to face an aptitude test at some stage in their life. It is therefore wiser to face the fear now and find out what these tests involve than crossing your fingers and waiting for the worst.  Whenever you fail to prepare you prepare to fail.

Let’s take numerical reasoning aptitude tests for example. Apart from knowledge on simple arithmetic, this test requires you to have a strong grasp of pie charts, tables and graphs. The types of questions asked need not the candidate to have crammed complex equations and formulas. They can easily be mastered through regular practice of aptitude tests. Once you have practiced numerical reasoning aptitude tests several times, the format will stick to your mind and you will have better chances for passing the numerical reasoning aptitude tests. As a matter of fact the format may become a second nature to you and you may not have any difficulty in them anymore.

Every candidate should understand that employers are looking to check if the best candidate is committed enough to have had gone an extra mile and had prepared for the assessments properly. The employer is not testing the level of your IQ but your dedication to high standards of performance and perseverance.

Verbal reasoning tests on the other hand are used to test candidate’s comprehension ability. The candidate might be presented with a short passage on any subject and required to read a short statement and state if it is true or false. It requires one to have a lot of practice in this area in order to pass the test. Practicing aptitude tests online have proven to improve the test scores of many candidate significantly. They help the candidate to know what the examiner is looking for and when the candidates know what the examiner is looking for then the tests prove more than manageable.

Abstract (or non-verbal logical) reasoning aptitude tests are used to test the ability of a candidate to follow logical sequences. Just like numerical reasoning aptitude test and verbal reasoning aptitude tests, practicing diagrammatic reasoning aptitude tests can help candidates improve their test scores significantly. It is important not to overthink diagrammatic reasoning aptitude test. Following the “gut instinct” is the most effective method for passing these aptitude tests.

Aptitude tests are used by the employer to distinguish the best and the most appropriate candidate for any job. These days, it is not enough to have impressive exam results and multiple extracurricular activities in order to secure your ideal job.  You need to master aptitude tests by practicing aptitude tests online in order to succeed and rein in today’s contemporary and competitive job market.

aptitude test tutorial

aptitude test tutorial, Aptutorial

Your chances of securing your dream job increase with a higher score on the test.  To achieve higher scores, ensure that you concentrate on aptitude tests that are most challenging to you and that is of most difficulty to others.

It is not so much about how difficult the aptitude test questions are but the time pressure of answering as many questions as possible in the shortest time possible. It goes without saying that the more you practice answering aptitude tests, the easier it will be. Some test publishers such incorporate negative marking (for incorrect answers) in the aptitude tests they offer. This means that the candidate will have to work quickly but systematically so if they make a wrong guess they may pay for it dearly.  Graduate Monkey offers Aptutorial Packages and test preparation packs to help you prepare for your aptitude test in most comprehensive way.  In sum, it may be worth investing your time in making use of the available resources online to prepare you for the test and launch you into your long-awaited career.

How to Pass Graduate Recruitment Tests?

How to Pass Graduate Recruitment Tests?GM_comics RESIZED

So you’re fresh out of school and applying for the job you’ve spent the last few years studying and preparing for. You’ve got the lambskin diploma to back you up. But you’re not out of the woods yet.

Because as it turns out, as you start applying to a graduate job, many of your employers are going to require something from you as a graduate recruit – a graduate recruitment test or, a company aptitude test.

Typically, aptitude tests are meant to test you on a variety of topics that your employer feels you’ll need when you take on the job you’re applying for. One of the most common types of tests you’ll be taking- the SHL reasoning test– comes with a variety of sections, including ones that cover numerical reasoning, logical reasoning, abstract reasoning, and diagrammatic reasoning. You might also be expected to complete the Saville reasoning test – which covers a wide variety of logical reasoning questions.

In short, your employer wants to make sure that you’ve got a basic handle on all the skills and smarts that the job requires. And for many employers, aptitude tests are almost like you’re being slotted on the first day of the job – all without clocking you in. It’s an easy way to know for sure if you’re the right person for the position.

With how important recruitment aptitude tests can be, it’s imperative to make sure that you’ve got a good handle on the material involved. And if you remember anything from your days back in university, you understand the importance of studying and preparing yourself for all kinds of exams. Aptitude test preparation is of utmost importance.

The number of questions varies from test to test. For example, the typical SHL numerical reasoning exam might have anywhere from 18 questions while an inductive reasoning exam might have about 24 questions. Chances are, you’ll have anywhere from 15 to 30 minutes to complete each exam and answer test questions, depending on how many questions it has and the subject matter.

Before you take your exam, it helps to have a good night’s sleep and a well-rounded breakfast. These aptitude tests may be shorter than your midterms and final exams back at university were, but they’re no less important. After all, how well you do on an aptitude test might affect whether or not a prospective employer will want to hire you.

There’s a ton of resources out there designed to help you feel better prepared for taking recruitment aptitude tests. For one, there are recruitment Graduate Monkey test tutorials that will help guide you step by step through various aptitude tests. Websites like aptutorial, Graduatemonkey.com and jobtestprep.co.uk have video tutorials designed to give you a good idea of what to expect when you take the exam.

There are also numerous websites out there that offer aptitude test preparation material, workbooks, and even practice tests to help you hone your skills.

Graduate Monkey, for instance, offers aptitude test preparation guides on a 4-month subscription basis. They also offer free recruitment test tutorials and videos designed to give you a good idea of what to expect and help you optimize your chances of finding your ideal career.

Well, you’ve got the resources. So what do you do?

Don’t wait until the last minute to prepare for your test. Cramming for your aptitude test in only one night before you take it won’t do you any favors.

Give yourself ample study time.

If you’re the kind of person who likes to take lots of notes and highlights passages- pick yourself up an aptitude test preparation work book. Then you can mark all the passages you need to and highlight any terms that you need to focus on.

Taking a practice test, whether that’s online or in a workbook, will do wonders for helping you prepare for the kinds of questions that will be asked on the aptitude test. Pay attention to any kinds of questions you had trouble with or got wrong- you’ll want to make sure you have a better understanding of these kinds of questions when you go to take your aptitude test.

When you’re testing for the aptitude exam, there are a few things to keep in mind.

For one, don’t leave questions unanswered. Most aptitude exams are multiple choice. If you’re confused about a question and you’re not sure what the answer is, sometimes it’s okay to guess the answer on the test, unless you’re told otherwise.

And when your aptitude test is scored, what tends to happen is, employers won’t take into account your complete score but instead how well you measure up to other applicants and people with similar backgrounds to you.

So when you take an aptitude test, it is key that you prepare yourself so you’re better able to ace the exam. After all, the best employee is a well prepared one, whether that’s on the job or while you’re testing.

 Aptitude Test- What does it Evaluate?

Aptutorial LATEST RESIZED Aptitude Test– What does it Evaluate?

If you’re a graduate looking for work after university, chances are that many of your employers require you to take an aptitude career test. You’ve probably, at some point, wondered why so many employers require these tests and what they all mean.

Well, many employers use a variety of different exams to test you on various skills they expect you to have mastered before you take on a job in the position they’re hiring for. Depending on the kind of job you’re applying for, employers use aptitude career tests to help determine if you’re a competent, well rounded candidate.

For example, the Cubiks test, which is a common test many businesses you might be applying for expect you to take, tests one’s problem solving skills, especially when it comes to numerical and verbal literacy. Many of the verbal problem solving questions you’ll be expected to answer concern how well you’ve got a handle on the English language- for example, you might be asked about antonyms or how to use deduction and reasoning. When you’re being quizzed on your numerical reasoning, you might be expected to complete a variety of simple and complex equations to ensure you’ve got a good handle on basic, mathematical skills and concepts.

Often times, many numerical reasoning tests will have you interpret information in graphs and charts to see if you’ve got a good handle on how to interpret data and statistics. These are important skills you’ll have to use on a daily basis in many of the jobs you’ll be applying for.

Abstract reasoning test, which is a common component of many aptitude tests you’ll be expected to take, involve testing your ability to analyze information and solve problems with complex thought processes. You’ll have to be able to make deductions, form theories, and understand the various relationships between verbal and non-verbal concepts.

The OneTest cognitive ability test relates to how well you’re able to reason and utilize various thinking styles in order to answer a variety of different questions. You’ll be tested on numerical, verbal, and nonverbal reasoning as well as your English proficiency and your deductive reasoning skills. And often times, you’ll only be given 23 seconds to answer each question, so quick that thinking is key.

A very important skill many employers will test you on is how well you’ve got a handle on mechanical reasoning. If you’re applying to become an engineer or are entering a technical field, you’ll probably be expected to take a mechanical reasoning test. During this test, you’ll be expected to utilize your knowledge of simple machines and physics in order to solve a variety of mechanical scenarios. And if you’re entering a mechanically inclined field, your employers want to know you’ll have the right skills and tools to be able to handle complex machinery and physical applications.

The TalentLens test is designed to test how well you can utilize various critical thinking strategies. For example, you’ll be tested on how well you can clarify your understanding of a subject, whether you can analyze and interpret the processes you took to reach a logical conclusion, and if you can make logical decisions based on the evidence you’re provided with.

Another common type of test you may be expected to take is the SHL aptitude test, which many employers use to test prospective employees. Some of the sections the SHL aptitude test covers include sections on numerical, verbal, or logical reasoning. Some employers such as PwC may even require a SHL personality questionnaire which is a type of psychometric assessment.

The Kenexa reasoning test also involves sections on numerical, verbal, and logical reasoning. Many employers will have prospective recruits take the logical reasoning portion, which involves using inductive reasoning to complete patterns and answer questions logically. Kenexa verbal tests are often tailored for individual positions and not only question how well you can utilize your verbal reasoning skills but can give your prospective employer a good idea on your managerial skills. Kenexa format is popular in investment banking and fund management industry.

And last but not least, one of the other tests you may be expected to take is the Saville reasoning test, which covers how well you’ll be able to use abstract critical reasoning in order to make a decision in various situations.

In order to pass any ability test or aptitude test you may be expected to take, it is important that you’re well prepared and know what to expect so you’re not caught off guard on test day.

Whether that means seeing aptitude test tutorials (aptutorials) or studying the different types of questions you may be expected to tackle during actual tests your employers are having you take, being prepared will give you a better chance to receive the highest aptitude test marks and be able to ace any aptitude exam. After all, many employers rely on the percentage of candidates who are efficient enough to pass aptitude tests to know whether they’re right for the job and it is their responsibility to prove that they are – before they give them a chance for an interview!