Tag Archives: non-verbal reasoning

Aptitude Test Practice Makes Perfect

Nowadays, scoring well in aptitude tests is gaining a lot of importance more than ever before for graduates and job applicants seeking to work for major graduate employers such as banks and accounting firms. This is because aptitude testing has become an integral part in the job recruitment process. As soon as you have clicked “send” on the online job application form, odds are that you will be promptly invited to take some online verbal and numerical reasoning tests. For those applying for more specialized roles, say IT or financial modeling perhaps, you will probably be required to take diagrammatic reasoning tests as well. Candidates must show ability to complete the numerical reasoning aptitude test, verbal reasoning aptitude test and diagrammatic reasoning aptitude tests quickly and carefully in order to qualify for the next stage of the job in question. In most cases, aptitude testing is the first stage in the screening process. If you succeed in this stage you will progress further to other interview rounds. However, don’t be surprised when you are subjected to further tests. It is therefore important to practice these tests way before the actual test.

Aptitude tests can strike fear at times even to the most confident student. It is important to note that almost everybody is likely to face an aptitude test at some stage in their life. It is therefore wiser to face the fear now and find out what these tests involve than crossing your fingers and waiting for the worst.  Whenever you fail to prepare you prepare to fail.

Let’s take numerical reasoning aptitude tests for example. Apart from knowledge on simple arithmetic, this test requires you to have a strong grasp of pie charts, tables and graphs. The types of questions asked need not the candidate to have crammed complex equations and formulas. They can easily be mastered through regular practice of aptitude tests. Once you have practiced numerical reasoning aptitude tests several times, the format will stick to your mind and you will have better chances for passing the numerical reasoning aptitude tests. As a matter of fact the format may become a second nature to you and you may not have any difficulty in them anymore.

Every candidate should understand that employers are looking to check if the best candidate is committed enough to have had gone an extra mile and had prepared for the assessments properly. The employer is not testing the level of your IQ but your dedication to high standards of performance and perseverance.

Verbal reasoning tests on the other hand are used to test candidate’s comprehension ability. The candidate might be presented with a short passage on any subject and required to read a short statement and state if it is true or false. It requires one to have a lot of practice in this area in order to pass the test. Practicing aptitude tests online have proven to improve the test scores of many candidate significantly. They help the candidate to know what the examiner is looking for and when the candidates know what the examiner is looking for then the tests prove more than manageable.

Abstract (or non-verbal logical) reasoning aptitude tests are used to test the ability of a candidate to follow logical sequences. Just like numerical reasoning aptitude test and verbal reasoning aptitude tests, practicing diagrammatic reasoning aptitude tests can help candidates improve their test scores significantly. It is important not to overthink diagrammatic reasoning aptitude test. Following the “gut instinct” is the most effective method for passing these aptitude tests.

Aptitude tests are used by the employer to distinguish the best and the most appropriate candidate for any job. These days, it is not enough to have impressive exam results and multiple extracurricular activities in order to secure your ideal job.  You need to master aptitude tests by practicing aptitude tests online in order to succeed and rein in today’s contemporary and competitive job market.

aptitude test tutorial

aptitude test tutorial, Aptutorial

Your chances of securing your dream job increase with a higher score on the test.  To achieve higher scores, ensure that you concentrate on aptitude tests that are most challenging to you and that is of most difficulty to others.

It is not so much about how difficult the aptitude test questions are but the time pressure of answering as many questions as possible in the shortest time possible. It goes without saying that the more you practice answering aptitude tests, the easier it will be. Some test publishers such incorporate negative marking (for incorrect answers) in the aptitude tests they offer. This means that the candidate will have to work quickly but systematically so if they make a wrong guess they may pay for it dearly.  Graduate Monkey offers Aptutorial Packages and test preparation packs to help you prepare for your aptitude test in most comprehensive way.  In sum, it may be worth investing your time in making use of the available resources online to prepare you for the test and launch you into your long-awaited career.

Why Do Recruiters Use Abstract (Logical, Inductive, Diagrammatic) Reasoning Tests?

Abstract reasoning Spearman diagramThe aptitudes and abilities assessed by verbal and numerical reasoning tests can readily be applied to real world jobs and positions, as many professional and even some non-professional tasks demand some skill with numbers and text. However, abstract reasoning tests, also known as logical or inductive reasoning assessment, appear to be made up of questions which  have little to do with applications in the real world. Yet these types of question come up in most graduate and management aptitude tests. So what is the use of these AR tests?

Abstract reasoning tests date back to the research done by the psychologist Charles Spearman in the 1920’s. Spearman used a statistical technique called factor analysis to examine relationships between people’s scores on different types of intelligence (IQ) tests.

He concluded that people who do well on some intelligence tests also do well on others (e.g. vocabulary, mathematics, spatial abilities, etc). Similarly, if people did poorly on one intelligence test, they also tended to do poorly on other intellectual tests. This led him to believe that there are one or more factors that are common to all intellectual tasks. As a result of this research, Spearman developed a two-factor theory of intelligence.

As the diagram above illustrates, Spearman said that intelligence mainly consists of “g” with bright people having a lot, and dull people having less. Spearman defined “g” as:

“the innate ability to perceive relationships and educe co-relationships”

If we replace the word “educe” with “determine” then you can understand why abstract reasoning questions are viewed to be a good measure of general intelligence, as they test your ability to perceive relationships and then to work out any co-relationships without you requiring any knowledge of language or mathematics.

Abstract reasoning tests use diagrams, symbols or shapes instead of words or numbers. They involve identifying the underlying logic of a pattern and then determining the solution. Because they are visual questions and are independent of language and mathematical abilities, they have come to be considered as an accurate indicator of one’s general intellectual ability as well as being “fairer” than many other aptitude test methods.

If you would like to learn more about Abstract reasoning test and to master the skills to get a top score on this test, then visit www.graduatemonkey.com. Look for Logical (Abstract) Reasoning Test Tutorial pack.